The Wall, the Wobble, and the Wilderness

a wall with a door in it. Toastmasters are always improving their craft. However, that doesn’t mean we don’t sometimes wonder ‘what was I thinking’ when we committed to giving a particular speech. Especially when it’s the night before and we’re panicking and hitting a wall.

Hard.

Maybe it’s not coming together and we’re worried we’ll look like idiots.

Or maybe it’s the wrong topic that has us in a panic.

Maybe it’s just not quite the right fit. Recently, someone had one speech ready and then when the moment came, she felt inspired, and delivered a completely different speech that what she’d planned.

Hmmmmm…

What if it’s about taking a bigger risk and stepping on to a new learning edge? What if feeling unprepared just means the process for creating speeches has changed from the first moment we stand behind the lectern and deliver (or read!) our Icebreaker speech?

This idea was brought home to me in my recent experience giving a speech about the Wall, the Wobble, and the Wilderness..

And one other W too. You can read more about it here.

What’s Your Motive? The Why Your Audience Needs to Know

Your Story Audience ToastmastersWhat’s your motive?

Detectives work long hours, interviewing family and friends to figure out the “why” in every crime. The motive.

In a court of law, it isn’t necessary to prove motive. It is not an element of many crimes or can be hard to decipher (serial killers), but proving motive often makes it easier to gain conviction.

Motive describes the reasons in the accused’s history, background, prior relationships or station in life that could have led to the moment when he/she made the choice to commit the crime. Motives are oftentimes broken down into three categories; biological, social and personal. It’s where the drama is. This is where the affairs reside, the allegations of abuse come forward or pressure to have funds to live like the Jones’.

It answers the “why.” And people want to know the “why” in criminal cases and your speech.

So, I ask you, what is your motive? What lead to this moment? To this speech? What are you trying to tell your audience? Why?

It is important to tell your story. Incorporate a bit of you into your speech. Each of us is playing a lead role in a constant unfolding story that no one else could write. It is our history, background, prior relationships or station in life that has given us our unique spin.

It doesn’t have to be center stage in every speech, blog — but knowing where you are coming from, your motive, will help you to engage your audience. Like a jury, your audience wants to know what lead to this moment. They want to see a slice of the real person behind the blog, behind the podium. It’s a connection that will help them see your point of view and feel closer to you.

Answer the why.

What’s your motive?

What's Your Motive? The Why Your Audience Needs to Know

Your Story Audience ToastmastersWhat’s your motive?

Detectives work long hours, interviewing family and friends to figure out the “why” in every crime. The motive.

In a court of law, it isn’t necessary to prove motive. It is not an element of many crimes or can be hard to decipher (serial killers), but proving motive often makes it easier to gain conviction.

Motive describes the reasons in the accused’s history, background, prior relationships or station in life that could have led to the moment when he/she made the choice to commit the crime. Motives are oftentimes broken down into three categories; biological, social and personal. It’s where the drama is. This is where the affairs reside, the allegations of abuse come forward or pressure to have funds to live like the Jones’.

It answers the “why.” And people want to know the “why” in criminal cases and your speech.

So, I ask you, what is your motive? What lead to this moment? To this speech? What are you trying to tell your audience? Why?

It is important to tell your story. Incorporate a bit of you into your speech. Each of us is playing a lead role in a constant unfolding story that no one else could write. It is our history, background, prior relationships or station in life that has given us our unique spin.

It doesn’t have to be center stage in every speech, blog — but knowing where you are coming from, your motive, will help you to engage your audience. Like a jury, your audience wants to know what lead to this moment. They want to see a slice of the real person behind the blog, behind the podium. It’s a connection that will help them see your point of view and feel closer to you.

Answer the why.

What’s your motive?